Sarah Lucas, Human Toilet II, 1996

The academic who was to open the Professor A. Katz Memorial Evening wore her best dress. Elizabeth Woolacott was a large-boned, energetic woman. The dress, from an Oxfam shop, was antique gold velvet in sumptuous folds of burnish and tarnish. Before the start of proceedings she hurried to the ladies’ lavatory. She was holding her notes and a glass half full of white wine. She placed both objects on the ledge over the washbasins, entered a compartment and hiked up the dress, showing a bush of black, wiry pubic hair. She pissed, wiped and pulled the chain. The dress fell back to mid-calf. She abandoned the wineglass, retrieved the notes and made her way to the lecture hall, whooping in mezzo-soprano to a colleague.

Short story: ‘The Professor A Katz Memorial Evening’ by Laura Del-Rivo
Sarah Lucas, Human Toilet II, 1996

The academic who was to open the Professor A. Katz Memorial Evening wore her best dress. Elizabeth Woolacott was a large-boned, energetic woman. The dress, from an Oxfam shop, was antique gold velvet in sumptuous folds of burnish and tarnish.

Before the start of proceedings she hurried to the ladies’ lavatory. She was holding her notes and a glass half full of white wine. She placed both objects on the ledge over the washbasins, entered a compartment and hiked up the dress, showing a bush of black, wiry pubic hair. She pissed, wiped and pulled the chain. The dress fell back to mid-calf.

She abandoned the wineglass, retrieved the notes and made her way to the lecture hall, whooping in mezzo-soprano to a colleague.

Short story: ‘The Professor A Katz Memorial Evening’ by Laura Del-Rivo

picadorbookroom
picadorbookroom:

How to Raise a Child: 10 Rules from Susan Sontag1. Be consistent.2. Don’t speak about him to others (e.g., tell funny things) in his presence. (Don’t make him self-conscious.)3. Don’t praise him for something I wouldn’t always accept as good.4. Don’t reprimand him harshly for something he’s been allowed to do.5. Daily routine: eating, homework, bath, teeth, room, story, bed.6. Don’t allow him to monopolize me when I am with other people.7. Always speak well of his pop. (No faces, sighs, impatience, etc.)8. Do not discourage childish fantasies.9. Make him aware that there is a grown-up world that’s none of his business.10. Don’t assume that what I don’t like to do (bath, hairwash) he won’t like either.[via: Brain Pickings]

picadorbookroom:

How to Raise a Child: 10 Rules from Susan Sontag

1. Be consistent.
2. Don’t speak about him to others (e.g., tell funny things) in his presence. (Don’t make him self-conscious.)
3. Don’t praise him for something I wouldn’t always accept as good.
4. Don’t reprimand him harshly for something he’s been allowed to do.
5. Daily routine: eating, homework, bath, teeth, room, story, bed.
6. Don’t allow him to monopolize me when I am with other people.
7. Always speak well of his pop. (No faces, sighs, impatience, etc.)
8. Do not discourage childish fantasies.
9. Make him aware that there is a grown-up world that’s none of his business.
10. Don’t assume that what I don’t like to do (bath, hairwash) he won’t like either.

[via: Brain Pickings]

If one meets a powerful person – Adolf Hitler, Joe Stalin or Bill Gates – ask them five questions: “What power have you got? Where did you get it from? In whose interests do you exercise it? To whom are you accountable? And how can we get rid of you?” If you cannot get rid of the people who govern you, you do not live in a democratic system.
 Tony Benn (3 April 1925 – 14 March 2014